Cooking With Wine

Homemade Fish Stock

  Recipe:  4 pounds fish frames (bones) from sole, flounder, halibut, and/or turbot, cut into 2-inch pieces and rinsed clean of any blood 1/2 cup dry white wine About 2 quarts water 2 medium onions, very thinly sliced 4 stalks celery, very thinly sliced 2 medium carrots, very thinly sliced 2 dried bay leaves 1/4 …

 

Recipe: 

  • 4 pounds fish frames (bones) from sole, flounder, halibut, and/or turbot, cut into 2-inch pieces and rinsed clean of any blood
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • About 2 quarts water
  • 2 medium onions, very thinly sliced
  • 4 stalks celery, very thinly sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, very thinly sliced
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves and stems
  • 6 to 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • Kosher or sea salt
  •  

    Directions:

    1. In a 7 to 8 quart stockpot, combine the fish bones, white wine, and just enough water to cover (you won’t need the full 2 quarts of water here). Bring to a boil, skimming off the white foam from the top of the stock as it approaches boiling, then reduce the heat so the stock simmers. (Using a ladle and a circular motion, push the foam from the center to the outside of the pot, where it is easy to remove.)

    2. Add the onions, celery, carrots, bay leaves, parsley, thyme, and peppercorns and stir them into the liquid. If the ingredients are not covered by the liquid, add a little more water. Allow the stock to simmer gently for 20 minutes.

    3. Remove the stock from the stove, stir it again, and allow it to steep for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer and season lightly with salt. If you are not going to be using the stock within the hour, chill it as quickly as possible. Cover the stock after it has completely cooled and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days, or freeze for up to 2 months.

     

    (Recipe from Epicurious.com)

     

    Mussels Tagliatelle

    FEATURING SONOMA DRY CREEK VALLEY CHARDONNAY

    Recipe: 4lbs fresh mussels, washed, de-bearded and scrubbed 1 tablespoon butter 1 medium onion, diced 1 clove garlic 1 cup fish stock 1 cup dry white wine  1 tablespoon olive oil 1 x 400g can chopped tomatoes 8oz tagliatelle , linguine or spaghetti fresh chopped parsley salt and pepper to taste Directions: Bring a large …

    Recipe:

    4lbs fresh mussels, washed, de-bearded and scrubbed

    1 tablespoon butter

    1 medium onion, diced

    1 clove garlic

    1 cup fish stock

    1 cup dry white wine 

    1 tablespoon olive oil

    1 x 400g can chopped tomatoes

    8oz tagliatelle , linguine or spaghetti

    fresh chopped parsley

    salt and pepper to taste

    Directions:

    Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil to have standing by to cook your pasta. Melt the butter and olive oil in another large pan. Add the onions and saute over low-medium heat until the onions are translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic to the onions and cook another 5 minutes. Meanwhile add the pasta to your boiling water and cook according to package directions. Add the fish stock, white wine, tomatoes and the mussels to the onions and garlic. Cover and steam for 5-6 minutes, shaking gently to ensure even cooking. When all the mussels have opened (discard any that have not), remove the mussels from the pan and set aside. Season the sauce with salt and pepper to taste. Drain your pasta and add it to the sauce, gently stir to combine. Plate the pasta into 4 individual servings, place the mussels on top of the pasta and sprinkle with chopped parsley.

    Serves 4.

    Mussels Tagliatelle

    (Image from BBC Good Food)

     

    Pear, Parsnip and Celery Root Soup

    FEATURING WASHINGTON YAKIMA VALLEY PINOT GRIS

    With the temperatures cooling off it’s a perfect time to cook up an nice warming soup. This delicious soup utilizes the beauty of all that this lovely season has to offer. Recipe:1 tablespoon butter1 tablespoon olive oil1 med onion, diced1 large parsnip, peeled & diced1 cup celery root, peeled & diced (about 2 medium sized)1 …

    With the temperatures cooling off it’s a perfect time to cook up an nice warming soup. This delicious soup utilizes the beauty of all that this lovely season has to offer.

    Recipe:
    1 tablespoon butter
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 med onion, diced
    1 large parsnip, peeled & diced
    1 cup celery root, peeled & diced (about 2 medium sized)
    1 clove garlic, finely chopped
    2 large pears, peeled, cored & diced
    1 cup dry white wine
    4 cups chicken stock
    1 cup apple juice
    salt & pepper to taste
    1/4 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

    Directions:
    1. Heat butter and olive oil in a large soup pot over low-medium heat. Add the onions and saute about 10 minutes or until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, parsnips and celery root and saute another 5 minutes. 
    2. Add the wine and increase heat to bring the wine to a simmer. Simmer the wine for 6-7 minutes or until the wine has reduced by half. Add the chicken stock, apple juice and pears. Reduce the heat to a low simmer, partially cover the pot and simmer slowly for about 1 hour. 
    3. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste, add the nutmeg and remove from heat. Allow the soup to cool, transfer to a blender and puree the soup. Note that it’s very important to allow the soup to cool before blending and you may have to blend in batches depending on the size of your blender. A hand immersion blender would work well here too.

    (Recipe from Madeline’s Adaptations.com)

     

    Roasted Butternut Squash Risotto

    FEATURING CHILEAN SAUVIGNON BLANC

    The first of this season’s squash are here and it’s time to take advantage of all the gorgeous varieties available. This creamy, rich, velvety risotto is a wonderful platform for the beautiful flavours of sweet, nutty butternut squash. Recipe: 1 butternut squash (about 2 lbs) 2 tablespoons olive oil 6 cups chicken stock 6 tablespoons …

    The first of this season’s squash are here and it’s time to take advantage of all the gorgeous varieties available. This creamy, rich, velvety risotto is a wonderful platform for the beautiful flavours of sweet, nutty butternut squash.

    Recipe:

    1 butternut squash (about 2 lbs)

    2 tablespoons olive oil

    6 cups chicken stock

    6 tablespoons butter

    1 minced shallots

    2 ounces pancetta

    1 1/2 cups arborio rice

    1/2 cup dry white wine

    1 cup Parmesan cheese

    1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg

    Directions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 400F. Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Rub the inside of the squash with olive oil and season lightly with salt and pepper. Place the squash flesh side up on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for 30-40 minutes or until the flesh of the squash is fork tender. Remove from the oven and allow to cool enough to be able to handle the squash. Once cooled, use a spoon and scoop out the flesh from the skin and set aside. 

    2. Pour the chicken stock into a small saucepan and cover it will a lid. Bring the stock to a simmer, then reduce heat to low to keep it simmering.

    3. In a heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven, melt the butter and saute the pancetta and shallots on medium-low heat for 10 minutes, until the shallots are translucent but not browned. Add the rice and stir to coat the grains with the butter. Add the wine and cook for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the simmering stock to the rice. Stir constantly and simmer until the stock is absorbed, about 5 minutes. Continue to add the stock, 2 cups at a time, continuously stirring, again until the stock has been absorbed by the rice and then add more stock until the rice is cooked through but still as a bite to it or al dente, about 20 minutes. Season the risotto with salt and pepper to taste, add the nutmeg, remove from heat and gently stir in the squash and parmesan cheese. Serve immediately.

    Serves 4-6.

     

    Roast Turkey with White Wine and Rosemary

    FEATURING WASHINGTON YAKIMA VALLEY PINOT GRIS

    1 cup low-sodium chicken stock 1 cup unsalted butter 1/2 cup white wine 2 sprigs rosemary 1 lemon cut into 3/4″ pieces 2 tablespoon honey 1  12-pound turkey 1 tablespoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 10 cloves garlic, peeled Directions: 1. To make the basting liquid: Bring chicken stock, butter, and wine to a boil in a small saucepan over high heat. Add the rosemary and simmer for 20 minutes. …

    1 cup low-sodium chicken stock
    1 cup unsalted butter
    1/2 cup white wine
    2 sprigs rosemary
    1 lemon cut into 3/4″ pieces
    2 tablespoon honey
    1  12-pound turkey
    1 tablespoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon black pepper
    10 cloves garlic, peeled

    Directions:

    1. To make the basting liquid: Bring chicken stock, butter, and wine to a boil in a small saucepan over high heat. Add the rosemary and simmer for 20 minutes. Add the honey, remove from heat, set liquid aside, and keep warm.

    2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Season the turkey with salt and pepper. Stuff the turkey with the lemon and garlic cloves. Using kitchen twine, truss the turkey. Place the turkey, breast side up, in a roasting pan fitted with a wire rack. Baste turkey with liquid and roast, basting again every 30 minutes, until a thermometer inserted into the thigh meat reads 175 degrees F, about 3 hours. Remove the turkey from the pan, cover loosely with foil and let the turkey rest for 30 minutes before carving.

     

    Steak-Frites

    FEATURING FRENCH GAMAY NOUVEAU

      Recipe: 4 beef steaks, such as porterhouse, sirloin, rib eye, shel or filet mignon (1/2 pound each and ¾ to 1 inch thick), or one 2-pound steak 5 tablespoons unsalted butter Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste  ¼ cup French Gamay Nouveau  Directions: Melt 3 tablespoons of the butter in a large …

     

    Recipe:

    • 4 beef steaks, such as porterhouse, sirloin, rib eye, shel or filet mignon (1/2 pound
      each and ¾ to 1 inch thick), or one 2-pound steak
    • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
    • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 
    • ¼ cup French Gamay Nouveau 

    Directions:

    Melt 3 tablespoons of the butter in a large heavy skilet or sauté pan over high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the steaks and sear for 1 minute on each side. Reduce the heat to medium. Season the steaks generously with salt and pepper and continue cooking, turning the steaks every other minute, until you see little pearls of blood come to the surface, about 6 to 8 minutes. For juicy, tender meat the steaks should be cooked medium rare.

    Remove the steaks and place them on warmed plates. Over medium heat, deglaze the pan with the water and swirl in the remaining 2 tablespoons butter. Drizzle these pan juices over the meat and serve at once with fries.

    (Serves four)

    Steak Frites

    Best French Fries Ever

    There is no fancy skill involved in making these crispy fries, but there is a trick. The potatoes are fried twice. The first time cooks them through and makes them tender. The second time, which can be done hours later just before serving, turns them golden brown and deliciously crisp.

    You won’t need a lot of special equipment, but a few items are essential. If you own an
    electric deep fryer, you’re al set. If not, a 4-quart fryer with a basket insert and a separate deep-fat thermometer is your next choice. In a pinch, use a heavy pot that is at least 5 inches deep, a long-handled fried-food skimmer or very large long-handled slotted spoon, and a deep-fat thermometer.

    The size of the fries is a very personal matter. Some people like them very thin and crunchy. Others prefer them quite large so that they can be crispy on the outside and soft in the center. Experiment to find the size you like best. Very thinly cut potato sticks need a shorter frying time, and the thicker ones take a little longer.

    Note: When frying anything in deep fat, always keep a lid close by. In case of fire, turn off the heat and cover the pan.

    Recipe: 

    • 1 litre (4 cups) vegetable oil for frying
    • 1 kilogram (2 pounds) Idaho or russet baking potatoes or Yukon Gold potatoes,
      peeled, rinsed and dried
    • Salt to taste

    Directions:

    Pour enough oil into a deep fryer to reach at least halfway up the sides of the pan but not more than three-quarters of the way up. Heat the oil to 325°F. Cut the potatoes into sticks 1/2 inch wide and 2 1/2 to 3 inches long. Dry al the pieces thoroughly in a clean dish towel. This wil keep your oil from splattering. Divide the potato sticks into batches of no more than 1 cup each. Do not fry more than one batch at a time.

    When the oil has reached the desired temperature, fry the potatoes for 4 to 5 minutes per batch. They should be lightly colored but not browned. If your fryer has a basket, simply lift it out the remove the fried potatoes. Otherwise, use a long-handled skimmer to lift out the potatoes. Be sure to bring the temperature of the oil back to 325°F in between batches. At this point the fries can rest for several hours at room temperature until you are almost ready to serve them.

    When you are almost ready to serve, heat the oil again to 325°F. Fry the potatoes for the second time in 1-cup batches until they are nicely browned and crisp, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain on fresh paper towels or brown paper bags and place in a warmed serving bowl lined with more paper towels. Sprinkle with salt and serve.